< hide menu

May 27: Sent – to church

Since in 2005 I explored all of the towns on the left side of the En between Zernez and Scuol, I decided to venture beyond Scuol this time. On this day I wanted to see Sent, the next town downstream from Scuol. Just the train to Scuol and then a bus. Simple.

6167

6167.jpg

On the way, the En looking rather sedimentary.

6168

6168.jpg

More spring yellowry. I think these may all be dandelions, despite looking more like buttercups at this remove.

6175

6175.jpg

Trees against sky, grass against sky. I think this may be the valley leading up to the Flüelapass, as this was close to Susch.

6179

6179.jpg

Due to the window detailing being similar to the local railway stations, I've figured this is a switching station. Regardless, it's a really neat building — nice proportions, and the rows of embedded round stones are a great touch.

6180

6180.jpg

This would be a great crashsledding hill.

6194

6194.jpg

After the village of Lavin, Kühe serenely sunning and snacking.

6196

6196.jpg

Another tier of content cows.

6207

6207.jpg

It's a farm! It's a monastery! It's... Guarda!

6215

6215.jpg

Then the tower of the old Chastè Steinsberg hove into view over the Queen Anne's Lace, heralding our arrival at Ardez.

6219

6219.jpg

At which point we had to get off the train because there was track work or something being done before Scuol, an echo of the previous day's transit adventure. A woman who turned out to live in Sent advised me of this when she noticed I didn't seem to be understanding the train announcement very well. It was a straightforward bus ride to continue to Sent, just an earlier transfer than expected. Anyway, when we arrived in Sent she invited me for Kaffee & Kuchen at her house, where I met her husband and kids and had a very pleasant time sitting outside and conversing with them, in a mix of English and Deutsch. I still really appreciate that hospitality — above and beyond!

6223

6223.jpg

After that I explored all around Sent. Here, a glimpse of the distinctively nubbly church spire.

6230

6230.jpg

Like many of the Unterengadin towns, Sent is perched high on a hillside, affording grand framed views of the mountains across the valley.

6231

6231.jpg

A bold roof profile and quite old-looking sgraffito. I wonder why the ibex-frame is impinged upon by the window below, and why it appears to be cut off above. The palimpsest of sgraffito is often fascinating.

6234

6234.jpg

A delightful typical Engadin streetscape. Note the quoins on the yellowish building at left — they're painted, but since the sun angle is consonant with their imaginary lighting angle, they're especially trompe-l'oeil.

6235

6235.jpg

A slightly fuller view of the church. The church was built in the late 15th century, but the tower is much newer and, I just discovered via that article, is made of stained glass!

6240

6240.jpg

Inside, fair weather beyond the clerestory.

6241

6241.jpg

Impression of the vault, small but elegant with these starlike figures.

6247

6247.jpg

The organ and balcony in a lovely, very Engadin paneled-wood style.

6248

6248.jpg

These vegetal ceiling accents now remind me of the Michaelskirche.

6249

6249.jpg

The apse has this interesting sort of Stübli-like configuration, quite unusual.

6253

6253.jpg

A note about the church's renovation. Rumantsch looks and sounds so cool. It's like Italian gritted up a little with German sounds and phonotactics.

6255

6255.jpg

A rather topographical boulder/sculpture in the churchyard.

6257

6257.jpg

To the northwest, a velveteen mountain.

6259

6259.jpg

Right next to the churchyard, one finds an excellent lilac-tempered view down to the En and across the valley.

6261

6261.jpg

Looking back toward and beyond town from a nearby spot inside the church's side yard.

6263

6263.jpg

Dat apse. Back it up.

6264

6264.jpg

The side yard offers this rather grander expanse of view. The settlement in the middle distance is Scuol.

6266

6266.jpg

This is one of those outdoor spots I just want to live in. A perfect example of prospect-and-refuge.